Disks, keyboards, mice, monitors, floppy drives, tape drives

Archive-name: sun-hdwr-ref/part5
Posting-Frequency: as revised
Version: $Id: part5,v 1.6 1995/08/06 23:08:05 jwbirdsa Exp $

                       THE SUN HARDWARE REFERENCE
                     compiled by James W. Birdsall
                        (jwbirdsa@picarefy.com)

                                 PART V
                                 ======
                                 DISKS
                               KEYBOARDS
                                  MICE
                                MONITORS
                             FLOPPY DRIVES
                              TAPE DRIVES


DISKS
=====

    SMD
    ---

    MFM
    ---

    ESDI
    ----

    SCSI
    ----

   Performance information for some Sun stock SCSI disks:

	CAPACITY		207M	424M	669M	1.3G
        FORM FACTOR (in)        3.5     3.5     5.25    5.25
        AVERAGE SEEK (ms)       16      14      16      11.5
        RAW DISK TRANSFER       1.6     2.5-3   1.8     3-4.5
          RATE (Mbps)
        PERFORMANCE (Kbps)*     509     1012    779     1429
        RPM                     3600    4400    3600    5400
        BUFFER SIZE (K)         64      64      64      256
        MTBF (hours)            50,000  100,000 50,000  100,000

* "Sun performs a combination of random and sequential benchmarks to
   develop an overall measurement of performance for mass-storage
   products. These tests are performed on Sun systems and a geometric
   mean is calculated to generate a composite of the performance that a
   typical user might expect."

   Note that these numbers are highly nonauthoritative. In particular,
   Sun frequently uses several different disk mechanisms for a
   particular size (e.g. a SUN0207 may be a Maxtor LXT213S, a Quantum
   PD210S, or a Conner CP30200), and performance will vary between them.

xxx-xxxx        CDC/Imprimis/Seagate 94211-91
        5.25" half-height, 91M, used in 386i models.

        Looking at the back of the drive with the SCSI connector on the
        left, there are four horizontal jumpers and four vertical
        jumpers (which will be arbitrarily referred to as H0-H3 and
        V0-V3 from left to right; actual markings on the drive are
        unknown). H1 should always be jumpered, the other horizontal
        jumpers should always be unjumpered. V3 should always be
        jumpered; V0 through V2 seem to be the SCSI ID, MSB to LSB.

xxx-xxxx        Quantum ProDrive 105s
        3.5" half-height, 105M, used in the 3/80 and some SPARCstations.

        Looking at the base of the drive, with the front to the right
        and the SCSI and power connectors to the left, there are two
        groups of three jumpers.

        A2-A0
          SCSI id, MSB (A2) to LSB (A0).

        WS
          To spin up drive at power up, jumpered. To wait for START
          MOTOR command, unjumpered.

        EP
          Parity checking enabled when jumpered, disabled when
          unjumpered.

        SS
          Self-seek test enabled when jumpered, disabled when
          unjumpered. Should always be unjumpered.


    IPI
    ---

   IPI stands for Intelligent Peripheral Interface. It moves much of the
low-level I/O processing to the interface controller, relieving the
system CPU of the burden. Disks are daisy-chained as with SCSI, but up
to eight units are supported on one controller. As with SCSI, the chain
must be terminated. The maximum disk tranfer rate is 6M per second.

   Note that more than four disks on a controller usually loads it
heavily and can cause the system to be unstable. With high-performance
disks capable of sustained 6M per second transfers, even three can be
too much.

   Performance information for some Sun stock IPI disks:

	CAPACITY		911M	1.3G
	FORM FACTOR (in)	8	5.25
	AVERAGE SEEK (ms)	15	11.5
	RAW DISK TRANSFER	6	3.5-4
          RATE (Mbps)
	PERFORMANCE (Kbps)*	1368	1408
	RPM			3600	5400
	MTBF (hours)		50,000	100,000
	CONTROLLER		ISP-80	ISP-80

* "Sun performs a combination of random and sequential benchmarks to
   develop an overall measurement of performance for mass-storage
   products. These tests are performed on Sun systems and a geometric
   mean is calculated to generate a composite of the performance that a
   typical user might expect."


KEYBOARDS
=========

    Type 1
    ------

   No information.

    Type 2
    ------

   Type 2 keyboards were introduced with the Sun-2 model line (?). They
have large flat areas around the keys and have a distinctive
wedge-shaped profile. They have an RJ connector on the back and connect
to the CPU via an RJ cable. The mouse is completely separate on earlier
models; on later models such as the 2/50, the keyboard and mouse both
connect to an adapter which converts to a DB15. With this adapter, a
type 2 keyboard and Sun-2 mouse can be used with a Sun-3.

    Type 3
    ------

   Type 3 keyboards were introduced with the Sun-3 model line (?). They
have much smaller flat areas around the keys than a type 2 and the front
edge is curved downward rather than being a wedge. They connect to the
CPU with a male DB15 on the end of an integral coiled cable. The mouse
plugs into an RJ connector in the back of the keyboard.

   Since type 4 keyboards can be used with systems expecting a type 3
(see Misc Q&A #8) with only a connector adapter, presumably type 3
keyboards could be used with systems expecting a type 4.

   The pinout of the DB15 connector (on the CPU) is:

            1   RxD0 (keyboard)     8   GND
            2   GND                 9   GND
            3   TxD0 (keyboard)     10  VCC
            4   GND                 11  VCC
            5   RxD1 (mouse)        12  VCC
            6   GND                 14  VCC
            7   TxD1 (mouse)        15  VCC

    Type 4
    ------

   Type 4 keyboards were introduced with the 3/80, but are mostly used
on Sun-4 systems. They look like IBM PC 101-key keyboards. They have
8-pin DIN connectors on each side. One (doesn't matter which) connects
to a matching connector on the CPU; the mouse plugs into the other.

   Type 4 keyboards can be used with systems expecting a type 3 (see
Misc Q&A #8) with only a connector adapter.

   The pinout of the DIN-8 connector (female, on the CPU) is:

            7           1  GND              5  TxDA (Keyboard)
        8       6       2  GND              6  RxDA (Keyboard)
        5   4   3       3  Vcc              7  TxDB (Mouse)
          2   1         4  RxDB (Mouse)     8  Vcc

   Type 4 keyboards come in a variety of layouts for various countries.
The layout code is set with DIP switches hidden on the bottom of the
keyboard and can be retrieved with the KIOCLAYOUT ioctl. The switches
are under a pop-off plastic cover in one of the wells for the flip-down
keyboard feet. With the bottom row of the keyboard toward you and the
keys facing down, the rightmost six DIP switches govern the layout code.
The leftmost switch causes the keyboard to identify itself as a type 3
instead of a type 4, and the remaining switch does nothing (?).

    Type 5
    ------

   Type 5 keyboards are used with more recent Sun-4 models.

   Type 5 keyboards come in a variety of layouts for various countries,
as well as having a "UNIX" layout which changes the location of the
Control and Escape keys to their accustomed places. Six of the DIP
switches govern the layout code. Type 5 keyboards identify themselves as
type 4.

   Type 5 keyboards can be used with systems expecting a type 3 (see
Misc Q&A #8) with only a connector adapter.

    Type 5c
    -------

   Type 5c keyboards are the same as type 5, except that the keyboard
cable is captive.

    Alternatives
    ------------

   Get the ergonomic keyboard FAQ from Ashok Desai at
ashokd@Eng.Sun.COM.


MICE
====

    Sun-1
    -----

    Sun-2
    -----

   Optical mice, usually black, from Mouse Systems. They use a special
optical mouse pad with broad stripes. Cable with RJ connector which
connects either to the CPU directly or to an RJ-DB15 adapter (see type-2
keyboards above).

    Sun-3
    -----

   Optical mice, usually white, from Mouse Systems. They use the same
mouse pad as Sun-2 mice. Cable with RJ connector which connects to the
back of a type-3 keyboard.

    Sun-4
    -----

   Optical mice, usually white. They use a special optical mouse pad
with narrow stripes. Cable with DIN-8 connector which connects to a
type-4 or type-5 keyboard.

    Alternatives
    ------------

   Ren Tescher (ren@rap.ucar.EDU) maintains an unofficial trackball FAQ.

   In general, some models of trackballs from MicroSpeed (click'n'lock,
S-Trac), ITAC Systems (Mouse-Trak), Rollermouse, Evergreen Systems
(Diamond XX and XL-5), and Logitech are supposed to be Sun-compatible.

   The Logitech Trackman Mouse model T-CB1 is plug compatible with type 4
and 5 keyboards. According to Logitech, this model were OEM made for Sun
at their request.


MONITORS
========

    Monitor standards
    -----------------

TTL MONO

   These are used with very early Sun-2 monochrome video cards. Digital
signals. DB9 connectors.

ECL/TTL MONO

   Only the video signals are ECL level; the sync signals are still TTL
level. Digital signals. DB9 connectors.

   These are used with later Sun-2 monochrome video cards, Sun-3
monochrome video, and Sun-4 monochrome video; probably Sun-386i
monochrome video as well. They connect to the video system via a DB-9.
The pinout of the DB-9 (on the video system) is:

            1   VIDEO+              6   VIDEO-
            3   HSYNC               7   GND
            4   VSYNC               8   GND
                                    9   GND

   There are two standard resolutions, 1152 by 900 (normal) and 1600 by
1280 (high). Until recently, the standard scanning frequencies for
normal resolution were 61.8KHz horizontal and 66Hz vertical. The
standard scanning frequencies for high resolution are 89.3KHz
horizontal, 67Hz vertical.

GRAYSCALE

   Grayscale monitors may be connected to mg-style monochrome or to
color framebuffers. They use analog signals. When connected to a color
framebuffer, the green signal is normally the one used.

COLOR

   "4BNC" connectors are, as might be expected, four BNC connectors:
red, green, blue, and sync. "13W3" is an unusual connector combining a
10-pin D-shell and analog three video conductors:

                                 gray/          1  gnd*
        red   *   *              green blue     2  vertical sync*
         |   1o  2o  3o  4o  5o    |     |      3  sense #2
        (O)                       (O)   (O)     4  sense gnd
            6o  7o  8o  9o 10o                  5  composite sync
             *   *                              6  horizontal sync*
                                                7  gnd*
        * Considered obsolete, may not be       8  sense #1
          connected.                            9  sense #0
                                                10 composite gnd

   The codes for the three monitor-sense bits are:

        0 ???                   4 1152 x 900 76Hz 19"
        1 reserved              5 reserved
        2 1280 x 1024 76Hz      6 1152 x 900 76Hz 16-17"
        3 1152 x 900  66Hz      7 no monitor connected

    Models
    ------

365-1020        Sony 16" color monitor
        115VAC only, 4BNC connector. Operates at a resolution of 1152 x
        900, 66Hz vertical refresh rate, and 61.8KHz horizontal sync
        rate.

365-1063        Sony 16" color monitor
        Same as the 365-1020 but with a 13W3 connector.

365-1113        Sony 16" Multiscan monitor
        115/240VAC, FCC-B/VCCI-2, 13W3 connector. Operates at the
        following resolutions and sync frequencies:

                944 x 736   84Hz vert, 70.8KHz horiz  17" overscan
                1076 x 824  76Hz vert, 71.7KHz horiz  17" overscan
                1152 x 900  66Hz vert, 61.8KHz horiz  16" underscan
                1152 x 900  76Hz vert, 71.7KHz horiz  16" underscan
                1280 x 1024 67Hz vert, 71.7KHz horiz  16" underscan

365-1151        Sony 16" Multiscan monitor
        115/240VAC, FCC-B/VCCI-2, 13W3 connector on integral 1.2M video
        cable. Operates at the following resolutions and sync
        frequencies:

                1152 x 900  66Hz vert, 61.8KHz horiz
                1024 x 800  74Hz vert, 61.9KHz horiz

365-1159        Sony 16" Multiscan monitor
        Same as 365-1113, but has VLF.


FLOPPY DRIVES
=============

TAPE DRIVES
===========

    Formats
    -------

9-TRACK

   Half-inch reel-to-reel tapes.

QIC-11

   Quarter-inch cartridge tapes, maximum capacity 20M. The standard tape
drive for Sun-2's. Four tracks.

QIC-24

   Quarter-inch cartridge tapes, maximum capacity 60M. The standard tape
drive for Sun-3's. Nine tracks. Can also read and write QIC-11 tapes.
Note that there were actually two QIC-11 formats, one with only four
tracks (capacity 20M) and an extended one with nine tracks, which had
the same capacity as QIC-24 but slightly different formatting. SunOS
allows selection of QIC-24 or QIC-11 (by using different entries in
/dev) when using a QIC-24 drive, but does not distinguish between the
two varieties of QIC-11; if you write past the end of track four, a real
QIC-11 drive will not be able to read all the data. In general, this
doesn't matter unless you want to read the tape on a real QIC-11 drive,
or sometimes when making boot tapes.

QIC-150

   Quarter-inch cartridge tapes, maximum capacity 150M. Can read QIC-24
(and QIC-11?) tapes, but cannot write them (?).

    Models
    ------

xxx-xxxx        Archive 2150S
        Look at the back of the unit such that the SCSI connector is
        toward the bottom and the power connector is to the left. Below
        the power connector is a jumper block, made up of three rows of
        six pins each. Jumpers go from an odd-numbered column to the
        next even-numbered column (1 to 2, 3 to 4, 5 to 6), not crossing
        rows.

        row 1/cols 1-2 serial mode                      UNJUMPED by default
          Enables serial mode when jumped.

        row 2/cols 1-2 diagnostic mode                  UNJUMPED by default
          Enables diagnostic mode when jumped.

        row 3/cols 1-2 SCSI parity                      JUMPED by default
          Enables SCSI bus parity when jumped.

        cols 3-4    buffer disconnect size

                            buffer size (K)
                   2       4       6       8       12      16      24      32
                   --      --      --      --      --      --      --      --
            row 1: UN      UN      UN      UN      JU      JU      JU      JU
            row 2: UN      UN      JU      JU      UN      UN      JU      JU
            row 3: UN      JU      UN      JU      UN      JU      UN      JU

        cols 5-6    SCSI id
          Row 3 is the LSB and row 1 the MSB.

              END OF PART V OF THE SUN HARDWARE REFERENCE



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